Sticks ‘n Stones ‘n Dinosaur Bones: Review

Sticks ‘n Stones ‘n Dinosaur Bones: Being a Whimsical “Take” on a (Pre)Historical Event
by Ted Enik (Author) & G F Newland (Illustrator)

Publication: September 28th 2017
Publisher: Schiffer Publishing

Source: Review copy
Thank you Schiffer & Edelweiss

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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

The first book in the Unhinged History series is a ripping yarn–full of adventure and deceit–that brings to life the best-known public spat in all of paleontology: the bitter rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope and Othniel Charles Marsh.

This frenzy of discovery and one-upmanship–known today as the Bone Wars–was a gold rush-like scramble to find the most and “best” dinosaur fossils, thus bringing to glory to their respective home-base universities.

Lively and witty rhymes plus wonderfully demented illustrations reveal how the paleontologists’ infamous rivalry began, and how–despite making genuine and lasting contributions to the field–their mutual obsession with outdoing one another spun out of control.


The target audience for this Seuss inspired Palaeontology book is Five to Eight year old’s. When I was that age I wanted to be a palaeontologist when I grew up. Ok I really wanted to be a magical princess who could bring dinosaurs back to life and control them, but same-same. I would have eaten this book up a trillion times over. The rhyming is brilliant, it is informative and humorous and the 48 pages are all full of colourful and fun illustrations.

I absolutely adore these type books. The kids will just think they are having fun reading, but they are secretly learning about the early days of Palaeontology.

I will have to pick up a hard copy of this book for my son. I know as he gets older he’ll be a dinosaur lover too. I really do hope that these two go onto to do more books like this together on multiple topics – I’ll be keeping my eye out!

#LoveOzYaBloggers – Favourite Covers

#LoveOzYABloggers is hosted by #LoveOzYA, a community led organisation dedicated to promoting Australian young adult literature.

The theme for this fortnight is ‘Favourite Covers’.

Keep up to date with all new Aussie YA releases with their monthly newsletter, or find out what’s happening with News and Events, or submit your own!


Summer Skin by Kirsty Eagar. I love the hot pink forefront with the grey scale image behind. I think the cover is bold and beautiful just like the story. A kick-ass cover for a kick-ass book.

Green Valentine by Lili Wilkinson. Pink and Green, my two favourite colours and a combination of both will always tickle my fancy. I think this cover is super cute and sets the mood for the adorable story.

Beautiful Mess by Claire Christian. I am still yet to read this one (hope to get into it this month). I think the colours and gold embossing are simply stunning on the paperback, but try as I might I couldn’t get a picture to do the cover justice.

I’ve done a bit more detailed post using these books and their synopsis’s over on the #AusYABloggers site. If you want you can check that out HERE.

A Thousand Deaths: Graphic Novel Review

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Charmed, A Thousand Deaths by Erica Schultz
Genre: Graphic Novel
Expected Publication: October 24th 2017
Publisher: Dynamite Entertainment
Source: Review copy from Edelweiss
Thank you Edelweiss & Dynamite
Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥

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Dynamite Entertainment is proud to continue the story of Phoebe, Piper, and Paige, television’s fan-favorite witches, in all-new adventures set within the official continuity of Charmed!

A dark force has set its sights on the art world of San Francisco, utilizing a gallery exhibit to feed souls to the underworld and unleash demons into our reality. Only the Power of Three, harnessed by the Halliwell sisters, can stop the madness!


I was so excited when I discovered Dynamite had bought the rights to Charmed. I love Dynamite. But I was a little disappointed when I realised it was a reimaging and that it wasn’t a carry-on from the Zenescope comics that where season 9 and 10, carrying on from the TV show (8 seasons aired between 1998-2006).Season 9, 2010–2012, Issues: 24 & Season 10, 2014–2016, Issues:20.

Nevertheless I call myself a Charmed fan so I was determined to love Dynamite’s take on my favourite sister witches. I pre-ordered and read the first two issues and while I enjoyed them, It all felt a little lacking. My favourite thing about the Zenescope comics was seeing the girl’s children come into their powers and there whole larger family dynamic. I didn’t go on to buy issue three, but when I saw this combined edition on Edelweiss I knew I had to give the whole story arc a go. *spoiler* Possessor demon!

A Thousand Deaths combines one story arc spaced over five issues and I assume that the story was set around the third/fourth season. Leo is always around the manor, but Cole is not. Cole is mentioned in passing as being Phoebe’s lawyer, but that is all. I LOVED COLE, oops sorry.

The Bad: I really did find it hard at times to visually tell the sister’s apart and some of the photo covers were a rather odd.

The Good: It still had the TV show feel to it, be it the earlier episodes. I could hear the actresses’ voices as I was reading the dialogue.

I think this new version of the charmed ones is for all the hardcore fans. So, if you want to step back in time and are dying to hang with the sisters again, race out and buy a copy. I’m planning to buy Charmed #6, as I’m keen to see where Dynamite takes the sisters next.

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe: YA Review

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The Loneliest Girl in the Universe by Lauren James
Genre: YA Sci-Fi
Publication: 7th September 2017
Publisher: Walker Books
Source: Review copy from Walker
Thank you, you wonderful people
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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Can you fall in love with someone you’ve never met, never even spoken to – someone who is light years away?

Romy Silvers is the only surviving crew-member of a spaceship travelling to a new planet, on a mission to establish a second home for humanity amongst the stars. Alone in space, she is the loneliest girl in the universe until she hears about a new ship which has launched from Earth – with a single passenger on board. A boy called J.

Their only communication with each other is via email – and due to the distance between them, their messages take months to transmit across space. And yet Romy finds herself falling in love.

But what does Romy really know about J? And what do the mysterious messages which have started arriving from Earth really mean?

Sometimes, there’s something worse than being alone . . .


Wow, what a page turner. The dates across the tops of the pages really push the story along and create a heavy tension. You’ll want to read this in one sitting.

Romy was born on The Infinity, a star ship despatched with the mission to create a human colony on a new planet. Romy has never ever known any other life then that onboard The Infinity and after an incident takes both her parents away from her, she is alone. Romy is further away from earth than any human has ever been, hurtling towards the unknown. The weight of a new human colony, by default, resting on her teenage shoulders. Romy has to grow up fast! to have any hope of completing her parents mission.

Poor mental health due to the toll that guilt and grief cause is a big part of three integral characters storylines and there were some beautiful scenes, like the one where Romy makes peace with her Mother (I cried). But the highlights for me were the sections of the book where Romy is fast thinking and fighting for her life. I was ripping through the pages desperate to see what happened next.

There is so much more I could talk about; Romy’s parents, ‘pen-pals’ and psychological torture, Romy’s cute-as bits of fan-fiction (kind of Rainbow Rowell Fangirl-ish – but it enhanced rather than detracted from the main story). But it’s so much more fun If you find these things out for yourself. Off you go.


Lauren’s Twitter | Website | Goodreads

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe @
Amazon AU | Amazon US | Booktopia | Bookdepository

Vampires Don’t Drink Blue Blood: Review

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Vampires Don’t Drink Blue Blood by Lily Luchesi
Genre: Paranormal/Crime
Publication: August 15th 2017
Source: FREE copy via Author’s newsletter
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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

In 1988, Angelica Cross worked with a mortal detective to take down a werewolf pack who were feeding on children at a local school playground.
In 2008, the killings begin again, and Angelica is called in to work the case alongside her old partner’s nephew, who likes Angelica as much as she likes garlic.
They need to put their animosity behind them, before more people are murdered.


Vampires Don’t Drink Blue Blood is a tasty bite sized prequel to Lily’s Paranormal Detective Series. In this short story Angelica must deal with a revenge seeking Werewolf while trying to keep a civilian Detective safe and in the dark about the paranormal perp. I really enjoyed the story and getting to live more of Angelica’s life before the events in Stake-Out.

I read this prequel after already reading the first five books, so some of the now deceased characters were a blast from the past. Hell, Angelica is still a Vamplet (half-human/half-vampire) and able to be out during the day.

Even though I am really excited to see how/where the last two books of the series go after the world altering ending of Last Rites, I actually loved being with pre-Danny Angelica in all her sassy, snarky Vamplet glory.

After the story Lily has included some Poetry based in/on the P.D.S world. There are characters files and an excerpt from the first book Stake-Out. Vampires Don’t Drink Blue Blood is a fantastic intro into the series, a great way to meet Angelica for P.D.S. novices and a must read for fans of the series.


 To get your FREE copy of this novella, subscribe to Lily’s newsletter: eepurl.com/cRh9Wn

#LoveOzYaBloggers – Historical

#LoveOzYABloggers is hosted by #LoveOzYA, a community led organisation dedicated to promoting Australian young adult literature.

The theme for this fortnight is ‘Historical’.

Keep up to date with all new Aussie YA releases with their monthly newsletter, or find out what’s happening with News and Events, or submit your own!


Today I’ve posted my entry for the Historical theme on the #AusYABloggers site. So if you want to find out a little bit more about the books I picked (with help from the other Mods), just click [HERE].

My posts for the previous prompts:

[Coastal]  [High School]  [Fantasy]  [Feels]  [Sci-Fi]  [Series]

Upcoming prompts are: October 9th, Favourite Covers & October 23rd, Spring Reads. For Favourite Covers my plan is to do my own post here, as well as a joint post on the #AusYaBloggers site – oh so many pretty covers to come.

Doctor Who: Anthology Review

17973716Doctor Who: Eleven Doctors, Eleven Stories by Eoin ColferMichael ScottMarcus SedgwickPhilip ReevePatrick NessRichelle MeadMalorie BlackmanAlex ScarrowCharlie HigsonDerek Landy Neil Gaiman.

Genre: Sci-Fi Anthology
Publication: January 1st 2013
Publisher: Puffin
Source: Purchased Paperback
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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

The Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Anthology is the perfect collection of adventures for Doctor Who fans.This print edition is the culmination of a year-long series of ebooks to celebrate fifty years of Doctor Who. Eleven Doctors, eleven stories, eleven unique interpretations of the Doctor, his terrifying alien enemies and his time-travelling adventures.68f7401d778bc1c6927303e0df0c0b7d

It’s taken me nine months to read this book. It is a wonderful book, but I’ve just been reading one story here and there between my other reads. As I finished reading each one I wrote down a few thoughts > > >

The First Doctor: A Big Hand for the Doctor by Eoin Colfer
A brilliant J.M. Barrie inspired adventure. Original old man Doctor and his granddaughter Susan, Children stealing Space Pirates, a fight scene on a London Rooftop and a big explosion to finish the bad guys off. 5/5 I Love, love, loved it Stars.

The Second Doctor: The Nameless City by Michael Scott
The recorder playing doctor and his Kilt wearing Scottish companion captured by an army of glass apes with their makers, the Archon, trying to steal the TARDIS. A set of bagpipes the weapon that saves the day = awesomeness! 4/5 I really liked it Stars.

The Third Doctor: The Spear of Destiny by Marcus Sedgewick
Following the third Doctor and his companion Jo as they witness the origin’s of Norse mythology and foil The Master’s plans. The Norse myths were woven into this Doctor vs Master story wonderfully. 4/5 I really liked it Stars.

The Fourth Doctor: The Roots of Evil by Philip Reeve
The Scarf wearing Doctor’s future comes forward to haunt him in a story featuring a tree that’s waited nine hundred years for revenge and the humans that have adapted to living within its branches. 4/5 I really liked it.

The Fifth Doctor: Tip of the Tongue by Patrick Ness
Pure Patrick Ness. The celery wearing Doctor and a boy named Jonny. Two separate yet interconnected stories. An enslaved alien race set free. It is amazing how much depth Ness crammed into a short story. 4/5 I really liked it.

The Sixth Doctor: Something Borrowed by Richelle Mead
This story follows the Doctor and his companion Peri as they go to a world where everything resembles Las Vegas. They ruin a wedding and The Doctor and The Rani (a female time lord) face off. 2.5/5 I sort of liked it. It just didn’t hook me or wow me, but I think that was more the mood I was in reading it, rather than the story itself.

The Seventh Doctor: The Ripple Effect by Malorie Blackman
Following the Doctor and his companion Ace while they rush to explore a collapsing alternate universe where the Daleks are a nurturing, peaceful race and Skaro is the universal hub of premium education. 4/5 I really liked it.

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The Eighth Doctor: Spore by Alex Scarrow
The one-hit-wonder-movie-time Doctor comes across a spore that threatens to wipe out all life on earth. He bamboozles the US military into letting him take over, then saves everybody and everything. 4/5 I really liked it.

The Ninth Doctor: The Beast of Babylon by Charlie Higson
This story is set between the spot at the end of the first Ninth Doctor episode when Rose turns the Doctor down and the TARDIS wheezes out then comes seemly right back. During what was a mere second or two for Rose, this story is what the Doctor go up to. The doctor’s companion for this trip is Ali, a young female who also happens to be a super warrior and a rather large crustacean. Together they set out to defeat two out of control stars’. Up until this point in the anthology all the Doctor’s companions had been human (ignoring Susan because no one can decide if she was gallifreyan or an adopted human). I really enjoyed the freshness of Ali’s differences. 5/5 I loved it.

The Tenth Doctor: The Mystery of the Haunted Cottage by Derek Landy
My Doctor and Martha collide with a being that creates illusions to trick you based on the fictional stories in your head, while feeding off the energy you create while your belief is suspended. 4/5 I really liked it Stars.

The Eleventh Doctor: Nothing O’Clock by Neil Gaiman
The Doctor and Amy Pond, obviously quite early in their time together as Rory hasn’t joined them yet, come across a long-forgotten foe of the time lords who causes the extinction of humans. 4/5 I really liked it Stars.

#LoveOzYaBloggers – Coastal

#LoveOzYABloggers: 'Coastal'

#LoveOzYABloggers is hosted by #LoveOzYA, a community led organisation dedicated to promoting Australian young adult literature.

The theme for this fortnight is ‘Coastal’.

Keep up to date with all new Aussie YA releases with their monthly newsletter, or find out what’s happening with News and Events, or submit your own!


When I saw the Coastal prompt, I thought “U’beauty, I’ll do books set in Newie”. Newie being my teenage stomping grounds. I already had two YA books sitting on my shelf that are set in Newie and I assumed considering Newcastle is the second oldest city in Australia, beaten out only by Sydney, and that it is still one of Australia’s biggest shipping ports, it wouldn’t be hard to find a third.

I Googled and found quite a few non-fiction books. I consulted the Newcastle Writers Festival Facebook group and ended up with recommendations for some fantastic sounding Aussie adult contemporaries and thrillers, which have been added to my TBR list, but no YA!

I decided to stick with #loveozya books based in Newie for this week’s prompt anyway, in the hope that somebody out there can prove me wrong and give me a third!

7493681Surf Ache by Gerry Bobsien

Paperback, 265 pages
Published 2009 by Walker Books
*

This is a story about a family who embark on a sea-change moving from Melbourne to the coastal city of Newcastle. It’s about the crazy impact this move has on the kids in the family, Ella and Creaky, and the resilience of young people to handle change. Ella is fifteen and finds herself in a new town having to start all over again leaving behind a full and happy life complete with best friend and boyfriend. In Newcastle, Ella doesn’t know who to be or what to do but she slowly starts to make new friends. A dancer for most of her young life, Ella is thrown into a new world where surfing is the city’s obsession and she takes it on with all the joy of a new challenge. Through Ella’s newfound love of the sea, we learn a few secrets about her mum’s controversial past as a gun surfer. Above all, this is a story about family and love and the secrets we keep. It’s a book about girls doing things. Through Ella, we are infected with a passion for dance and surfing. This complete immersion in doing something you love is an important part of this book.

6889947Losing It by Lizzie Wilcock

Paperback, 314 pages
Published March 1st 2006 by Scholastic Australia
*

Once you’ve lied about something, lying becomes easy. You keep lying to cover your tracks. The lie grows. It becomes huge. Savage. Hungry.’

Gabbie likes her life just the way it is. She has a cool best friend and parents she can tell anything, and she’s just met the perfect guy.

But there are some things you can’t control. When her best friend starts to go off the rails, Gabbie finds it harder and harder to share the truth with her parents. Her family is changing, and that may become the biggest problem of all . . .

“Losing It” was shortlisted for the Young Adult Fiction Prize in the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards, 2006.


My posts for the previous prompts: 

 [High School]  [Fantasy]  [Feels]  [Sci-Fi]  [Series]

New Release Q&A with Lauren James

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe by Lauren James
Genre: YA Sci-Fi
Publication: TODAY
Publisher: Walker Books
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Can you fall in love with someone you’ve never met, never even spoken to – someone who is light years away?

Romy Silvers is the only surviving crew-member of a spaceship travelling to a new planet, on a mission to establish a second home for humanity amongst the stars. Alone in space, she is the loneliest girl in the universe until she hears about a new ship which has launched from Earth – with a single passenger on board. A boy called J.

Their only communication with each other is via email – and due to the distance between them, their messages take months to transmit across space. And yet Romy finds herself falling in love.

But what does Romy really know about J? And what do the mysterious messages which have started arriving from Earth really mean?

Sometimes, there’s something worse than being alone . . .

Lauren James – Q&A

  1. Where did the inspiration for The Loneliest Girl in the Universe come from?

Funnily enough, it started with a question from some Physics coursework at university! The question was about special relativity, and went something like this:

An astronaut travels in a spaceship to a new planet. After a few years, a newer faster ship is developed and launched, which overtakes the first ship. How old are the two astronauts when they each arrive on the planet?

I started thinking about what it would be like to be that first astronaut, and dedicate years to travelling alone in space, only for your ship to be overtaken by a faster one before you even arrive! What would that feel like? What kind of relationship would you have with the person on the faster ship? From that, the story of Romy Silvers was born.

I’ve always loved stories of isolation – it’s a great way to really get to know a character. I knew that if I was writing a whole book where there was only really one person, I would need to create a character who would keep the reader’s attention and loyalty. It was a big challenge, but I fell totally in love with Romy while I was writing about her, and I hope everyone reading The Loneliest Girl in the Universe does too.

  1. Did you always dream of becoming a writer?

I started writing The Next Together when I was sixteen, and finished the first draft when I was nineteen. I never intended to get the story published – I was writing just for myself, for fun! The first draft was very self-indulgent, and included cameos from some of my professors, and lots of in-jokes. There was no pressure to write something good. I was just writing for myself, telling myself a bedtime story after classes. I never saw it as doing something scary or difficult.

I always loved the idea of being a writer, but I absolutely didn’t think it was possible. I thought people who became authors must have spent their whole life writing, and I was too interested in doing other things for that.

My second novel The Last Beginning, which I wrote after I’d got a book deal, was about twenty times harder because suddenly there was all of this pressure. I had to push past a lot of fear which had never been there before.

Being an author is quite similar to how I imagined it, though – spending a lot of time alone, staying up late at night to write, summoning the devil in exchange for book ideas..….wait, what?

  1. How did you feel when secured your first publishing deal at 21?

It was very exciting and scary, and I still feel very lucky! When The Next Together was finished I left it for a few months, and when I came back to it, I was surprised to find that it wasn’t as terrible as I remembered. It even made me laugh a few times. I decided to send it off to some literary agents, just to see if they could give me some useful feedback.

I had absolutely no idea how the publishing industry worked, and I think I read one How To article on query letters before writing one and blithely sending it off into the aether. I found an A to Z list of agents and started emailing with the Z’s, because I thought they’d have the least submissions. In the end, I found an agent on W, after I’d emailed only six agencies. It was a very naive way to apply, but I got very lucky – my agent is incredible, and last year she was shortlisted for the Bookseller’s Agent of the Year award.

We then submitted to publishers after a whole year of revisions (I was still at university so could only really work on it during the holidays) and within two weeks, two publishers had offered. Saying it now, that seems so easy and fast, but at the time it was the most stressful, delirious fortnight of my life. I’ve been through the submission process several times since then, and it does not get any easier.

  1. What is your favourite book?

I love Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho, Radio Silence by Alice Oseman, Lirael by Garth Nix, Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell by Susannah Clarke and Far From You by Tess Sharpe.

  1. What authors have influenced your writing?

Neil Gaiman, Rainbow Rowell, Sarah Waters, P. G. Wodehouse, Audrey Niffeneger.…..I could go on all day, I think! In particular I’m always making notes when I read books by Douglas Adams – he’s the master of humorous sci fi. I’ve adored his work since I was young.

I read a wide range of genres, and because of that I try to make my books a little bit of every genre – The Loneliest Girl in the Universe is a bit fandom, a bit thriller, a bit romance and a bit sci fi.

I think if I didn’t write a variety of different genres, I’d probably get bored. My next books are a mix of different genres again – my latest book, which I’m still writing, is a paranormal supervillain origin story. So something completely different, again!

  1. What book do you wish you had written?

I love The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater. She has an incredible way of really making her characters seem like real people, and I learn so much about writing different perspectives from her work. The set up of that series is just absolutely my favourite thing, and I’m forever jealous I didn’t invent the character Gansey.

I also read Laura Ruby’s writing with a huge amount of jealousy. Her latest, YORK, is so so so good.

  1. What issues do you like to explore in your writing?

I always try to include LGBT+ characters in my books. I was so frustrated as a teenager because, as a huge sci fi fan, I could never find diverse characters in the worlds I loved. Recently there’s been some amazing progress in this direction (like The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet) but at the time, it felt a completely barren wasteland. I wanted to write about a character who was gay, but the book wasn’t a coming out story. I wanted them to get to do things, while being gay.

  1. How has your interest in science influenced your writing?

I studied Chemistry and Physics at university, so if I hadn’t become a writer, I would probably be a research scientist focusing on physical chemistry. I would love to go back to science one day – I really miss it!

I always try to make the science in my books as accurate as possible, and I did a lot of research into space travel and the theory of space travel behind NASA’s equipment when writing The Loneliest Girl in the Universe.

The time machine in The Last Beginning is also based on real life research into sub-atomic particles at CERN, like the Large Hadron Collider. Based on the predictions physicists have made about the possibilities of time travel, I thought that was a logical starting point to progress from. I wanted to feel very real and possible – it’s simplified a lot in the book from how these things might actually work, but the grounding of the science is very plausible. I hope! [crosses fingers no physicists immediately call me on my mistakes]

  1. What was it like to see your books translated into another language?

It’s huge. Seeing my words in another language is something I’ve always wanted to have – so it’s incredible that it’s actually happened! I can’t quite believe it still.

I’m especially proud of the Brazilian edition, as I studied in America for a year, and spent most of my time hanging out with Brazilian students who were also studying abroad for a year. So there was a LOT of excitement amongst my friends when the translated edition came out in Brazil. They keep sending me pictures of it, and trying to persuade everyone to buy it!

  1. Would you go into space if you could?

I’m not sure. I think I’m probably not as brave as Romy. I might go after tourism space travel has been running for a few decades and it has been proven its safe, but definitely not yet!

Lauren James was born in 1992, and graduated in 2014 from the University of Nottingham, UK, where she studied Chemistry and Physics.

She started writing during secondary school English classes, because she couldn’t stop thinking about a couple who kept falling in love throughout history. She sold the rights to the novel when she was 21, whilst she was still at university.

The Next Together described by The Bookseller as ‘funny, romantic and compulsively readable’ and Kirkus as ‘An ambitious, promising premise . . . James is one to watch’. It was longlisted for the Branford Boase Award, a prize given to recognise an outstanding novel by a first-time writer.

Her other novels include The Last Beginning, the epic conclusion to The Next Together which was named one of the best LGBT-inclusive works for kids and young adults by the Independent. Two short stories set in the world of The Next Together series, Another Together and Another Beginning, are also available.

The Loneliest Girl in the Universe was inspired by a Physics calculation she was assigned at university. Lauren is a passionate advocate of STEM further education, and all of her books feature scientists in prominent roles.

Lauren is published in the UK by Walker Books, in the US by HarperCollins and in translation in five other countries around the world. She lives in the West Midlands and is an Arts Council grant recipient. You can find her on Twitter at @Lauren_E_James, Tumblr at @laurenjames or her website http://www.laurenejames.co.uk, where you can subscribe to her newsletter to be kept up to date with her new releases and receive bonus content.

No Limits: YA Review

35298151No Limits by Ellie Marney
Genre: Contemporary
Publication: August 14th 2017
Publisher: Self-Published
Source: Review copy from Author
Thanks Ellie, you wonderful woman
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Rating: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Boozer, brawler, ladies’ man – nineteen-year-old Harris Derwent is not a good guy.

His one attempt to play the hero – helping out his old flame, Rachel Watts – has landed him in hospital. Now injured, broke, and unemployed, he’s stuck back in the country, at his father’s mercy. Harris needs to pay off his dad’s debts, and fast. But working as a runner for a drug cartel is a dangerous path – especially if Harris agrees to narc…

Eighteen-year-old Amita Blunt is the perfect police sergeant’s daughter – practical, trustworthy, and oh-so responsible. Getting involved in Harris’s case was never part of the plan. But working at the hospital, she’s invisible – which makes her the ideal contact for a boy feeding information back to the police…

Harris and Amie’s connection is sizzling hot – but if the cartel finds out about them, things could get downright explosive. Backed into a corner, with everything at stake, it’s time for Harris and Amie to find out if love really has no limits…


Woah! What an action-packed adventure ride this book was. I loved it. It was fan-frigging-tastic!

Right from the start I was enjoying reading this book; Ellie’s writing, the characters and the prospect of romance and drama. The story reeled me in, fast, and I was happy to be hooked.

Harris’s dad is an evil arsehole. Had to be said! He has subjected Harris to emotional and physical abuse his whole life, making Harris an emotionally closed off hard arse. We meet Harris at an extreme low point. He has no self-worth and a bit of a death wish. Enter Amie.

Amie’s dad is a good man, a man of the law. And Amie has a loving extended family. After the death of her mother Amie can’t bear being separated from her remaining family. So, she plans on giving up her dreams of studying photography and visiting far off places to stay and be near them. Little help here please Harris (and Nani).

Harris and Amie are two extremely different people, but the chemistry between them is undeniable right from the start. Each helping the other heal, let go and move on to bigger and better things – oh and there is a whole lot of criminal activity, dangerous dudes and wrongs righted in between.

Meth, not even once mate! Methamphetamine, Crystal Meth, Crank, Speed, Ice, Poor Man’s Cocaine etc. whatever the hell you want to call it, it’s poisonous s**t. I really liked how Ellie went into detail with her characters drug use without glorifying it. The message of the damage it can do shines through the story, but she’s not preachy.  She shows the painful truths, the negative side effects and deadly consequences. She also bothers to show how it feels, and why they do it.

The last eight chapters were a full-on adrenalin rush. I was physically anxious, my stomach was churning as I flew through the words, racing to find out how it all ends. Totally worth it! The ending made my heart sing.

I can see myself reading this book again. I really enjoyed getting to know Harris and Amie intimately, and the rush of experiencing their world.

Harris does feature in the last book of Ellie’s Every series, but you in no way need to read it first. Do yourself a favour, go and buy No Limits and fall in love with Ellie’s story telling awesomeness .

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